Confined Space at North Country Chamber; Instructed by Kevin O’Brien of Access Compliance!


October 17th
8am – 4:30pm
“This training is for you if your company has manholes, trenches, vaults, ducts, boilers, vessels, storage tanks, pits, crawl spaces or other uniqueconfined spaces where your employees will need to enter to perform work.
Topics include:6+
hazard recognition,
work practices,
atmospheric monitoring and rescue and emergency requirements.
It will take a look at key provisions outlined in both General Industry and Construction.”
http://www.northcountrychamber.com/Calendar/Detail/308

Upcoming Free Webinar–NFPA 350: A New Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work

 
“Current OSHA and ASSE confined space standards and regulations are performance-based standards that provide minimum requirements for confined space entry. NFPA 350, Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work, is a new NFPA document intended to provide information on how to comply with existing standards by simplifying terminology, addressing gaps, and providing additional information on how to comply with confined space standards and regulations. For example, NFPA 350 helps identify inherent, introduced, and adjacent confined space hazards and provides detailed information on selection, calibration, and use of atmospheric monitoring devices.
 
This webinar will provide an overview of the information provided within the standard and will explain how it can be used to support an existing confined space entry program.”
 
 
DATE: March 29
TIME: 2:00PM
Need more Confined Space Training? Check out our calendar for upcoming Confined Space Classes Offered! 

Residual Confined Space Hazards … An Unintended Booby Trap!

1116furr2
“For those of you that enjoy watching or reading a good action thriller, or have experience in the military or police, you probably already understand that an effective booby trap should be undetectable to the intended target(s), can be set and remain “loaded” and ready to be sprung for a good period of time, and will cause confusion and irrational reactions for those not caught in its immediate effects. In the old days, booby traps relied on very thin trip wires as their trigger; with the advent of electric eyes and lasers, the somewhat detectable trip wire is a relic from the past. But the booby trap is still a very real hazard for the military and police who must be aware of their existence and, for the actor playing the role of our action hero, not so much.

But there are other booby traps out there. And these booby traps do not intentionally “target” any unsuspecting souls. They are not set in a malicious manner, but their effects can be every bit as lethal as the ones that are intentionally set. These booby traps are not set with criminal intent, but, truthfully, the fact that they have been responsible for multiple fatalities among unsuspecting confined space entrants borders on criminal. These are the booby traps that are left behind in a confined space after certain entry operations or other work tasks are completed. And the point about being undetectable without certain precautions and equipment is a perfect example of the most insidious of them all—atmospheric hazards.”
Click here to read more!

Peer-to-Peer Wireless: A Game Changer for Confined Space Monitoring

????????????????????????????????????
“You’ve probably heard the same confined space story too many times. A confined space entrant is performing routine work and becomes unresponsive. The attendant responsible for monitoring the work enters the confined space to check on the entrant and is overcome by deadly gas. It’s a tragic story of trying to help a co-worker based on gut reaction rather than proper safety protocols. According to OSHA, would-be rescuers make up 60 percent of confined space fatalities.

Unfortunately, it’s common for workers serving in the attendant role or “hole watch” to be inexperienced, untrained, or easily distracted by the numerous demands of a work site. Distractions can come in the form of radio calls, paperwork, talking to co-workers, or even while monitoring multiple confined spaces at one time. These distractions are rampant and increase the need for safety equipment that reduces the likelihood of human error.

Properly training all workers before they work in or around confined spaces is a must but, in reality, not every job is performed under ideal conditions or with enough information about gas hazards. New advances in gas detection equipment take these tragic real-world scenarios to heart and incorporate better communication technology to ensure everyone working around confined spaces will not only hear and see gas alarms, but also know where and why instruments are alarming. These new technologies aim to reduce would-be rescuer fatalities and accidents due to false evacuations. They also facilitate faster emergency response from trained peers in the field, rather than relying on help from a central controller many miles away. While it’s common for workers to perform atmospheric testing in confined spaces with handheld portable instruments, area monitors with peer-to-peer wireless capability can improve efficiency and safety of confined space operations, particularly those calling for extended, continuous monitoring.”
Click here to read more!

Can an Industrial Vacuum Solve Confined Space Hazards?

816kennedy1
“Two workers died this week and two will die next week, statistically speaking, in confined space-related accidents, according to OSHA data that documents an average of 92 deaths and nearly 11,000 injuries per year. Of those 92 annual deaths, one-quarter of them occur during repair, maintenance, cleaning, and inspection activities that occur in enclosed spaces.

Despite OSHA’s spotlight on confined spaces, the number of deaths remains relatively the same as 23 years ago. In November last year, the National Fire Protection Association released NFPA 350: Guide for Safe Confined Space Entry and Work to provide extended guidance and best practices to fill in gaps or confusion in relation to OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.146.

Working in septic tanks, silos, reaction vessels, vats, boilers, holding tanks, pits, or similar structures or enclosures qualifies as working in a confined space. OSHA defines a confined space as one that is large enough for an employee to enter fully and perform assigned work; is not designed for continuous occupancy by the employee; and has a limited or restricted means of entry or exit.”
Click here to read more!

Upcoming Webinar–Confined Space: Issues and Clarification of OSHA Confined Space Rescue “In a matter of minutes, an emergency in a confined space can result in serious injury or worse, a fatality. And studies show that 60% of confined space fatalities are “would be” rescuers – employees who become victims when their emotions takeover without thought of the hazards they may confront trying to rescue their co-worker. OSHA’s Confined Space regulation allows rescues to be performed by in-house or outside third party rescue teams who are onsite at the facility. All individuals with an active role in confined space rescue must be aware of the hazards, be properly trained and equipped and maintain proficiency levels, and practice simulated rescues before an emergency incident. The rescue team’s ability to perform the rescue duties under pressure is critical and when selecting rescue personnel, a physical and psychological evaluation of the employees or outside contractors must be carefully considered. Many employers choose to use “Call 911” as the rescue team, not realizing that a fire department may not be trained in confined space rescue or their response cannot be performed in a timely manner or not available to respond at all. In this webinar, we will discuss confined space rescue, the issues employers face when rescue personnel is not properly trained or equipped, and the importance of having an onsite in-house trained rescue team or third party industrial rescue team, or combination of both, rather than relying on the local fire department. During this webinar, you will learn: How to evaluate and select confined space rescue personnel, in-house and/or third party. What training and equipment is required to develop a higher performance rescue team. Issues with contractors and how to verify they are confined space and confined space rescue trained. Why you should reconsider using Call 911 as your only confined space rescue plan. Register For This FREE Webinar Below DATE: June 30, 2016 TIME: 2:00PM ” https://ohsonline.com/webcasts/2016/03/confined-space-issues-and-clarification-of-osha-confined-space-rescue.aspx?admgarea=Webinar&tc=page00

images
“In a matter of minutes, an emergency in a confined space can result in serious injury or worse, a fatality. And studies show that 60% of confined space fatalities are “would be” rescuers – employees who become victims when their emotions takeover without thought of the hazards they may confront trying to rescue their co-worker.

OSHA’s Confined Space regulation allows rescues to be performed by in-house or outside third party rescue teams who are onsite at the facility. All individuals with an active role in confined space rescue must be aware of the hazards, be properly trained and equipped and maintain proficiency levels, and practice simulated rescues before an emergency incident. The rescue team’s ability to perform the rescue duties under pressure is critical and when selecting rescue personnel, a physical and psychological evaluation of the employees or outside contractors must be carefully considered. Many employers choose to use “Call 911” as the rescue team, not realizing that a fire department may not be trained in confined space rescue or their response cannot be performed in a timely manner or not available to respond at all.

In this webinar, we will discuss confined space rescue, the issues employers face when rescue personnel is not properly trained or equipped, and the importance of having an onsite in-house trained rescue team or third party industrial rescue team, or combination of both, rather than relying on the local fire department.

During this webinar, you will learn:
How to evaluate and select confined space rescue personnel, in-house and/or third party.
What training and equipment is required to develop a higher performance rescue team.
Issues with contractors and how to verify they are confined space and confined space rescue trained.
Why you should reconsider using Call 911 as your only confined space rescue plan.
Register For This FREE Webinar Below
DATE: June 30, 2016
TIME: 2:00PM ”
Click here to register!

Upcoming Free Webinar

logo-ohs

 

“2016 Confined Space/Fall Protection Update
ADOSH Construction Update with emphasis on confined spaces and fall protection. The participants will gain an understanding of state plans as well as what regulations are looked at more closely.

A brief overview of the confined spaces standard and where we are today with fall protection will be included.

REGISTER BELOW TODAY FOR THIS FREE WEBINAR!
DATE: March 17, 2016
TIME 2:00PM”

 

More details and to register here!

Atmospheric Testing and the New OSHA Construction Confined Spaces Standard

1215bonino2
“In August 2015, OSHA’s new standard for “construction work” in confined spaces became effective. This standard describes requirements for practices and procedures to protect employees engaged in construction activities at a work site with one or more confined spaces. OSHA believed this needed to be put into effect because, previously, the only requirement for confined spaces in construction was training. OSHA concluded this was inadequate because injuries and fatalities continued to occur.
How does the new rule differ from the rules that previously applied to construction work performed in confined spaces? The rule requires employers to determine what kinds of spaces their workers are in, what hazards could be there, how those hazards should be made safe, what training workers should receive, and how to rescue those workers if anything goes wrong.”
Click here to read more!

Confined Spaces, This Wednesday!

date“December meeting of the Adirondack Foothills/Saratoga County Safety Group–Wednesday, December 9:
Confined Spaces: “Comparison of OSHA’s Confined Spaces in Construction and the General Industry Confined Space Standards. A general overview of the differences followed by a section by section comparison. Much of the information in the construction standard is similar to general industry. However, there are some subtle differences that John will mention as he covers similar sections of each standard.
Presenter: John Reinemann, CIH, Principal Industrial Hygienist, Access Compliance, LLC.
Unless otherwise noted all Adirondack Foothills/Saratoga County Chamber Safety Group Meetings will be held at the offices of the Saratoga County Chamber 28 Clinton Street.
Many of you know this already but feel free to bring guests from your company such as management or members of your safety committees. Just be sure to let us know the names of those who will attend so we can prepare name tags for them.” Chassafety@aol.com