2018 National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls to be held May 7-11


“The fifth annual National Safety Stand-Down to prevent falls in construction will be held May 7-11, 2018. Sponsored by OSHA, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and CPWR — The Center for Construction Research and Training, the weeklong outreach event encourages employers and workers to pause during the work day to talk about fall hazards and prevention. In past years, more than 1 million workers participated in events.”
https://www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/index.html

Monthly Toolbox Talk–March is National Ladder Safety Month (Shared from the Mohawk Valley Builders Exchange Newsletter)

Every year over 300 people die in ladder-related accidents, and thousands suffer disabling injuries. March 2017, the American Ladder Institute (ALI) is celebrating the first-ever National Ladder Safety Month, designed to raise awareness of ladder safety and to decrease the number of ladder-related injuries and fatalities.

This month we are focusing on ladder inspection.
Toolbox Talk: Ladder Safety
Inspect Ladders Carefully!
All ladders must be inspected for defects and/or damage periodically by a competent person, and after any occurrence that could affect their safe use.
Ladder users must inspect ladders before each use, and defective and/or damaged ladders must either be immediately marked in a manner that readily identifies them as defective/damaged, or be tagged with a “Do Not Use” tag or tag containing similar language. Defective and/or damaged ladders must not be used and
must be removed from service until repaired.
Look for warning signs. Check all ladder components for signs of wear, corrosion and structural failure before each use. These inspections should include:
 Rungs – Check for broken split, cracked, corroded or missing rungs.
 Side Rails – Check for broken, split, cracked, corroded or missing side rails.
Cracks – Check carefully for cracks; they are hard to see. Cracks weaken ladders.
 Excessive Bends – Check for rungs or side rails with excessive bends. Bent areas are greatly weakened and may fail during use.
Hardware – Check for ladders with loose, corroded, or weakened fasteners and hardware.
 Feet – Check ladders for missing or damaged feet. Ladder feet may have both non-skid pads for use on hard surfaces (concrete), and metal feet for soft surfaces (dirt).
 Coatings or Paint – Check for paint or other coating hiding defects. Wood ladders shall not be painted or coated with any opaque covering, except for identification or warning labels which may be placed on one face only of a side rail. When other types of ladders are painted it is very hard for the user to observe defects/damage such as cracks or dents and painted areas must be inspected carefully for hidden damage.
 Oil, grease, and other slipping hazards – Inspect ladders for oil, grease, moisture or other slippery materials before use and clean as necessary.
 Capacity – Check the capacity label and make sure the ladder has sufficient capacity to hold you and everything you are wearing/carrying.
 Please review other ladder safety tips pictured below.

Free Webinar–February 23–Fines, Fatalities and Working at Height


“Three of the top ten most-cited OSHA violations involve working at height. (Fall Protection, Scaffolding and Ladders). Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction workers. In this free webinar, we will discuss the most common citations in each of these categories and possible improvements through training and design.” Sign up for this free webinar here: https://ohsonline.com/webcasts/2017/01/fines-fatalities-and-working-at-height.aspx?admgarea=Webinar&tc=page0&m=2

Buying Fall Protection Equipment in 2017

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“According to various reports, the global fall protection equipment market will reach $3.5 billion by 2020. Considering this statistic and the ongoing requirement to repurchase soft goods, it’s likely that your organization will be buying fall protection equipment in the coming year.

When it’s time to buy new equipment, the recently released ANSI/ASSE Z359.1-2016 standard—now officially named the Fall Protection Code—is the most current and robust resource for information to ensure you are getting the right equipment to meet today’s standards. The Z359.1 standard takes effect on Aug. 14, 2017, and this breakthrough revision will most directly impact equipment manufacturers. But it’s critical for all buyers of fall protection equipment to learn about the new standards now to understand and prepare for the changes that come with the updated requirements. When you are properly educated, you can be a better consumer for your organization.”
Click here to read more!

How Fall Protection Has Changed Dramatically Over the Decades

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“According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, worker deaths in America are down from about 38 worker deaths per day in 1970 to 13 per day in 2014. However, the leading cause of death in the construction industry remains the same year in and year out: falls from height. In fact, nearly 40 percent of all worker deaths in 2014 were from falls. Although this current statistic is still startling, it is a 66 percent decrease from the numbers recorded more than 40 years ago.

So what has led to this marked improvement? Safety experts say better equipment, advancement in technology, and an overall shift in the safety culture are all key factors in reducing the number of worker deaths caused by falls.

Below is a deep dive into how the impact of technology, such as the development of self-rescue devices, as well as overall shifts in the safety culture on construction sites, both of which are leading to a more widespread adoption of and adherence to safety practices.”
Read more here!

A Fall Protection Guide to Working at Heights

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“Imagine this: It’s another typical day on the job site. A worker proceeds to climb high into position, where he begins his assigned tasks. He is comfortable and moving freely as he works. Suddenly, he loses his balance and falls from his post.

Thankfully, his employer believed in training and in utilizing appropriate fall protection equipment for those working at heights. It’s simple, really: The proper care and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) can turn a would-be tragedy into a minor inconvenience. However, as you will learn, there is much more to take into consideration.

This worker had taken the time to prep for his job, which included inspecting his fall arrest equipment and scoping out a solid anchorage point that could safely be reached while maintaining 100 percent connection. As this scenario continued to play out, when the worker fell, he entered the first stage known as the “free fall,” transitioning into a safe deceleration as his energy absorber activated to bring him to a (relatively) comfortable stop.”

Click here to read more!

What Happens After the Fall?

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“This year’s National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction took place the first week of May. Safety managers and construction workers at risk of falls took the time to focus on fall awareness, safety equipment use, and requirements. Federal groups responsible for worker safety such as CDC, OSHA, NIOSH, CPWR, DOL, ANSI, and numerous state agencies all participated.

We promoted and discussed Plan, Provide, Train—the OSHA and CPWR position for preventing falls. We all get renewed focus, and I suspect more workers take the time to erect proper guardrails, check safety nets, and wear a harness. Prevention is acknowledged as the best way to lower the fatality and injury rate. We all take a victory lap . . . and bad things still happen.

Three hundred people are going to die from construction related falls in 2016.
One of every 125 construction workers will die of a fatal fall in their career.
Falls cost the construction industry $300 million per year.”
Read more of this article here!

A Fall Protection Guide to Working at Heights

716irwin
“Imagine this: It’s another typical day on the job site. A worker proceeds to climb high into position, where he begins his assigned tasks. He is comfortable and moving freely as he works. Suddenly, he loses his balance and falls from his post.

Thankfully, his employer believed in training and in utilizing appropriate fall protection equipment for those working at heights. It’s simple, really: The proper care and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) can turn a would-be tragedy into a minor inconvenience. However, as you will learn, there is much more to take into consideration.

This worker had taken the time to prep for his job, which included inspecting his fall arrest equipment and scoping out a solid anchorage point that could safely be reached while maintaining 100 percent connection. As this scenario continued to play out, when the worker fell, he entered the first stage known as the “free fall,” transitioning into a safe deceleration as his energy absorber activated to bring him to a (relatively) comfortable stop.”
Click here to read more!