New Foundation report: Impact of Fixed Fire Fighting Systems (FFFS) on Road Tunnel Resilience, Ventilation, and other Systems

“Road tunnels are commonplace across North America and the world, providing the necessary path through mountains and under water, but they can cause unique challenges for safety with regard to ventilation and egress.” http://www.nfpa.org/news-and-research/fire-statistics-and-reports/research-reports/other-research-topics/impact-of-fixed-fire-fighting-systems-on-road-tunnel-resilience-ventilation-and-other-systems?order_src=C244

Enhancing data and analytics efforts to serve fire departments around the world

“Learn about NFPA’s journey to develop a data analytics framework to benefit fire departments and enforcement communities and improve fire safety with data analytics in a #FutureofData podcast.”

Article and photo shared from the NFPA newsletter: https://community.nfpa.org/community/nfpa-today/blog/2017/06/22/in-less-than-two-years-nfpa-has-come-to-be-regarded-as-a-thought-leader-in-fire-data

U.S. Experience with Sprinklers

“Sprinklers can help to save lives, but they were only present in 10% of reported structure fires and were only found in 7% of all home fires. NFPA’s new report examines sprinkler presence, reliability, effectiveness and impact in structure fires and in home fires.” Story and photo shared from NFPA’s newsletter: http://www.nfpa.org/news-and-research/fire-statistics-and-reports/fire-statistics/fire-safety-equipment/us-experience-with-sprinklers?order_src=C244

Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!


“President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed the first National Fire Prevention Week on October 4-10, 1925. It is observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls, in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began October 8, 1871, and did most of its damage October 9. The horrific conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres.
This year, Fire Prevention Week will be held October 8-14, 2017.
In a fire, seconds count. Seconds can mean the difference between residents of our community escaping safely from a fire or having their lives end in tragedy. That’s why this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme: “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!” is so important. It reinforces why everyone needs to have an escape plan. For more information and resources, please see the link below:
http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/campaigns/fire-prevention-week-audience
Please consider making Fire Prevention Week part of your site’s Home Safety Program this year.”

Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!

“President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed the first National Fire Prevention Week on October 4-10, 1925. It is observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which October 9 falls, in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began October 8, 1871, and did most of its damage October 9. The horrific conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres.
This year, Fire Prevention Week will be held October 8-14, 2017.
In a fire, seconds count. Seconds can mean the difference between residents of our community escaping safely from a fire or having their lives end in tragedy. That’s why this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme: “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!” is so important. It reinforces why everyone needs to have an escape plan. For more information and resources, please see the link below:
Please consider making Fire Prevention Week part of your site’s Home Safety Program this year.”

NFPA to develop fire risk assessment tool in response to tragic high-rise fires incident


“In light of a recent series of fires in high-rise buildings with combustible facades, including the Grenfell tower fire, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has initiated a project to develop a fire risk assessment tool for these types of buildings to assist local authorities globally with fire safety in their communities. This project builds on previous NFPA work begun over the past few years, related to growing concerns about fire risks associated with combustible wall insulation components.

“NFPA is committed to helping communities respond to current fire threats,” said Jim Pauley, NFPA president. “Given several recent tragic high-rise fires, this resource couldn’t be more needed or timely.”

The risk assessment tool will help authorities having jurisdiction (AHJs) prioritize mitigation by incorporating a methodology that identifies key variables (such as wall materials, building fire protection systems, etc.). The risk assessment tool helps characterize those variables in terms of risk or mitigation potential, and incorporates them into an engineering-based risk model. The project will be conducted by a global engineering team whose work will be overseen by an advisory panel of global stakeholders and experts. It is scheduled to be completed by the end of the year.

“The deadly fires that have occurred around the globe reflect a need to recommit and promote a full system of fire prevention, protection and education in order to help save lives and reduce loss,” said Pauley. “At NFPA, we’re doing all we can to support and provide jurisdictions with the tools they need to assess risk and deliver the level of safety people expect and deserve.”
Click here to view this news release on the NFPA webpage!

Shrinking Resources, Growing Concern


“In January, NFPA’s Public Education Division sent a survey to rural fire departments around the country to gauge their interest in an NFPA-hosted event that would address a range of rural fire issues. Pub ed staffers weren’t sure they could even attract enough participants to fill a room.

But the survey struck a nerve. More than 1,000 people responded, and the overwhelming answers were yes, we have issues we need to discuss, and yes, we want to do it with the help of NFPA.

In May, 60 members of rural departments from New England to Alaska converged on NFPA’s headquarters for the first Rural Fire and Life Safety Symposium in the United States to discuss the challenges they face—from finding volunteer firefighters to public education to battling wildfires—and how to address them. NFPA held a similar event in Canada in April. At both meetings, the concerns were as unique and specific as the participants themselves; for one fire department in coastal Washington, the biggest challenge is how to respond to a tsunami.”
Read more here!

Fire Alarm or Test?


“The sound of typing fingers on a computer keyboard. The laser printer printing copy after copy of the latest hot financial report for the 9:30 a.m. board meeting. The sound of phones ringing and paper shuffling.

All of these sounds produce a rhythm to office life. This rhythm continues throughout the day, with the exception of the scheduled breaks and lunch. Very few interruptions to this concerto of work are tolerated.

A loud fire alarm starts its whining and the strobes start their blinding flashes of warning that a fire is imminent. Or is it? No smoke is visible, and no one is going for the exits. It could be that annoying annual test that someone forgot to warn everyone about over the intercom. It could be the annual drill, but this project is more important to the company than going outside to a collection point to be counted so the Safety Coordinator can make a note on his or her checklist that it was done—or even to compare the speed to that of other plants and last year, justifying their value and usefulness to executive management.”
Click here to read the rest of this article.

NFPA Issues Fire Hose Safety Bulletin


“The National Fire Protection Association has issued an attack fire hose safety bulletin this week to remind the fire service to purchase, maintain, inspect, remove and repair fire hose in accordance with NFPA 1961, Standard on Fire Hose, and NFPA 1962, Standard for the Care, Use, Inspection, Service Testing, and Replacement of Fire Hose, Couplings, Nozzles, and Fire Hose Appliances.

“Research shows that flashover occurs eight times faster today, putting firefighters and their equipment at increased risk,” said Ed Conlin, Public Fire Protection division manager. “As NFPA’s Technical Committee on Fire Hose, the Fire Protection Research Foundation, and others consider attack hose characteristics and research gaps, it’s important that fire departments follow fire hose codes and make tactical changes to keep first responders safe during fast-moving fires.”
Click here to read more!

Preventing the Five Major Causes of Industrial Fires and Explosions


“Industrial fires and explosions cost companies and governments billions of dollars every year, not to mention the loss of life, which can’t be described in monetary terms. According to the most recent fire statistics from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), an average of 37,000 fires occur at industrial and manufacturing properties every year. These incidents result in 18 civilian deaths, 279 civilian injuries, and $1 billion in direct property damage.

These disasters happen for many reasons, often because managers and employees aren’t aware of the risks that surround them at work every day. When dealing with the risk of fires and explosions, it’s important to understand the most common causes.”
Click here to read more!