Is America’s Hazmat in Good Hands?

“I’ve never met a dangerous goods professional who told me he or she dreamed of managing hazardous cargo as a child. I’ve never met one who majored in “Hazmat Studies” in college or who even thought much about hazardous materials before taking the job.

Hazardous materials management, as it turns out, is a career many come to without necessarily meaning to. Because of their talents, reliability, achievements, and other qualities, they have been entrusted with protecting employees, property, and the public from the risks posed by materials that have the potential to explode, set aflame, corrode steel, poison, and otherwise damage human health and the environment. Hazardous materials management is a huge responsibility, and those entrusted with it take it seriously.”

Read the rest of the article here.

Safe + Sound Campaign: Show Your Workers Some Love by Committing to Safety and Health

Workers are the heart of every business. Show you care that they go home safe and sound every day by making a commitment to safety and health in your workplace. You can get started by:

Scheduling a safety walk-around. OSHA’s new fact sheet, Safety Walk-Arounds for Managers ( https://www.osha.gov/shpcampaign/docs/SHP_Safety-Walk-Arounds-for-Managers.pdf ), provides suggestions for conducting inspections that can help you evaluate the effectiveness of your current safety and health efforts, and communicate directly with workers about job hazards.

Attending the Safe + Sound Campaign’s first live, free webinar, Foundations for Safety Leadership, hosted by CPWR: The Center for Construction Research and Training on Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 2 p.m. EST [register now]. This webinar can support your efforts to become an effective safety leader and create a strong culture of safety.

(Shared from OSHA February 2nd QuickTakes)

Employers Must Post 300A Injury/Illness Summary Until April 30th

“OSHA reminds employers of their obligation to post a copy of OSHA’s Form 300A ( https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/RKforms.html ), which summarizes job-related injuries and illnesses logged during 2017. Each year, between February 1 and April 30, the summary must be displayed in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees and those in certain low-hazard industries are exempt from OSHA recordkeeping and posting requirements. Visit OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule webpage ( https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping2014/records.html )for more information on recordkeeping requirements.”

Employers Must Post Injury/Illness Summary Beginning February 1

“OSHA reminds employers of their obligation to post a copy of OSHA’s Form 300A, which summarizes job-related injuries and illnesses logged during 2017. Each year, between Feb. 1 and April 30, the summary must be displayed in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees and those in certain low-hazard industries are exempt from OSHA recordkeeping and posting requirements. Visit OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule webpage for more information on recordkeeping requirements.”