Think You Know Your Turkeys?

 
“Authorities dispute some of the lore about turkeys, but they agree that Americans may not know as much about the birds that many of them consume each Thanksgiving Day as they should. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service posted fun facts about wild turkeys earlier this month, and Smithsonian.com’s “14 fun facts about turkeys” post featured more useful information, some of it conflicting with the USFW data.
 
 
 
Both offered more than a mouthful of details about the birds.
 
Sounds: Turkeys make all kinds of sounds: fly-down or fly-up cackle; kee kee run; excited yelp, and more, according to USFW, which included a link to the National Wild Turkey Federation’s page of wild turkey sounds.
 
Gender: The two sources agreed that a turkey’s droppings tell its sex and age.
 
Plumage: An adult turkey has 5,000 to 6,000 feathers on its body, USFW reported.
 
Speed: USFW said turkeys “can clock more than 12 miles per hour, beating chickens by three miles per hour. But Smithsonian.com contends they can run up to 25 miles per hour and fly as fast as 55 miles per hour.
 
Symbolism: The Fish and Wildlife post says Ben Franklin thought the wild turkey “would make a better national symbol.” The post on Smithsonian.com, however, tells us that “Benjamin Franklin never proposed the turkey as a symbol for America, but he did once praise it as being ‘a much more respectable bird’ than the bald eagle.
 
One more thing, from USDA: Its Meat and Poultry Hotline, 1-888-MPHotline, will be open and taking calls from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern time on Thanksgiving day this year. The hotline, a free service launched on July 1, 1985, receives more than 80,000 calls a year asking questions about food safety.”
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PPE DONATIONS NEEDED

PPE DONATIONS NEEDED

NJ ASSE is facilitating the collection of PPE for workers and volunteers affected by the hurricane in Puerto Rico and the USVI.  We need the below items and attached HERE is a more detailed list. The sooner the better! Thank you for your support for hurricane relief efforts.

Please email President@nj.asse.org with the details of your donation (what PPE, quantity, shipment date, etc.) so that your organization can be recognized.

Thank you and Happy Holidays! – NJ ASSE Chapter.

Thanksgiving is next week. Let’s make it fire safe by sharing the following safety messages

Thanksgiving is next week. Let’s make it fire safe by sharing the following safety messages. (Shared from a recent US Fire Administration email.)
 
Practice Safe Cooking
As you plan your Thanksgiving menu don’t forget about fire safety.
Did you know Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires? The number of home fires double on Thanksgiving. So, let’s add a pinch of fire safety to the menu.
Keep these safety tips in mind as you prepare your meal.
Turkey:
If you are roasting your turkey, make sure you set a timer. This way, you won’t forget about the bird as you watch the parade or football.
If you are frying your turkey,
Use a fryer with thermostat controls. This will ensure the oil does not become over heated.
Thaw your turkey completely. Ice on the bird will cause the oil to splatter.
Don’t overfill the pot with oil. If you do, the oil will overflow when you add the turkey causing a fire hazard.
Keep children and pets at least three feet away from the fryer.
Also, always use the fryer outdoors.
turkey fryer safety
Stuffing and Potatoes:
Stand by your stove when you are boiling your potatoes or frying onions for stuffing. It is best to stay in the kitchen when you are frying, boiling or broiling. If you are in the kitchen, it is easier to catch spills or hazardous conditions before they become a fire.
Stay in the kitchen when cooking at high temperature
Vegetables:
Keep the area around the stove clear of packaging, paper towels, and dish cloths; anything that can burn.
Be sure to clean up any spills as they happen.
Be prepared. Keep a large pan lid or baking sheet handy in case you need to smother a pan fire.
Turn pot handles towards the back of the stove so you don’t bump them.
keep anything that can burn away from the stove
turn pot handles to the back fo the stove
By following these safety tips ( https://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/cooking.html ), you will have a delicious and fire safe Thanksgiving. Let the firefighters have dinner with their families, not yours.